TEAM TASKED WITH GIVING US FIVE EXTRA YEARS OF HEALTH AND HAPPINESS

The National Innovation Centre for Ageing is based in The Catalyst, the stunning new building with a glass façade rearing like a horse’s head out of the 24-acre, £350m science park that is the...

Opening new pathways for bioprocessing

A pivotal link between industry and academia, Teesside University’s £22m National Horizons Centre (NHC) opened last September with two very clear objectives. One is to drive research into bioprocessing, an often-overlooked subject through which life...

Tackling the trillion dollar Alzheimer’s disease

It’s almost impossible to conceive the complexity that lies ahead in the challenge to address Alzheimer’s disease. But, picture standing in front of an old mansion house, completely overgrown with ivy, trees, and shrubs....

Build-up of brain proteins affects genes in Alzheimer’s disease

New research has shed fresh light on how the build-up of two proteins in the brain might affect the activity of genes involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at the University of Exeter worked in collaboration...

Artificial intelligence yields new antibiotic

A deep-learning model identifies a powerful new drug that can kill many species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Using a machine-learning algorithm, MIT researchers have identified a powerful new antibiotic compound. In laboratory tests, the drug killed...

Biosimilars set to make significant UK impact

Biosimilar medicines - equivalent biological products which have no meaningful differences from the original or reference product in terms of quality, safety or efficacy - are playing an important role in providing choice for...

Diagnostic devices reimagined

Diagnostic devices are coming on in leaps and bounds but you may be surprised to learn that one device that’s remained much the same since the late 1950s is the colonoscope. One researcher working...

Patient recruitment: The balancing act

Well conducted patient and public engagement can have a positive impact on recruitment and retention. To really increase your chances of success you need to be engaging patients as early as possible in the...

Treading the path less travelled – A different approach to patient recruitment

In a previous issue, we spoke to Professor Miles Witham about his work to facilitate the participation of older people in clinical trials. Now we hear from Sarah Montague about a trial engaging homeless...

Entangled exploring the influences on brain development

Throughout history, much attention has been paid to the perceived differences between men’s and women’s brains – but are these differences real or imagined? One scientist overturning the myths of the ‘male’ and ‘female’ brain...

A golden era for blood cancer treatments

It’s an exciting time in blood cancer research. As we deepen our understanding of the biology of blood cancer, researchers are developing better treatments than ever before, and we’re even beginning to talk about...

The search for new antimicrobials

Few issues are more pressing than the global problem of antibiotic resistance, so we speak to Professor Mathew Upton, about his work searching for new antibiotics. “For so long now, antibiotics have been seen as...

New research predicts a positive future for biosimilars

The prospect of reducing treatment costs for payors supports a positive future for biosimilars Biosimilar approvals in the US market still significantly lag behind Europe despite an evolving regulatory landscape and three new...

Supercharged natural killer cells may hold promise for cancer

A type of ‘supercharged’ immune cell could be mass-produced to help fight cancer. The researchers behind the early-stage finding, from Imperial College London, say the development could mark the next generation of cutting-edge immunotherapy treatments,...

How chromosomes find a happy medium

By Sabrina Richards Staff writer at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hutch scientists show how chromosomes communicate to balance crossovers during sex-cell formation Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have worked out the molecular underpinnings of...

Stanford shows that breast cancers punch tunnels into neighbouring tissue

Stanford researchers have found that malignant breast cancer cells can extend protrusions known as invadopodia to dig escape tunnels through surrounding tissue, revealing a possible new target for therapies. Cancers pose the greatest danger when...