Biosimilars set to make significant UK impact

Biosimilar medicines - equivalent biological products which have no meaningful differences from the original or reference product in terms of quality, safety or efficacy - are playing an important role in providing choice for...

Diagnostic devices reimagined

Diagnostic devices are coming on in leaps and bounds but you may be surprised to learn that one device that’s remained much the same since the late 1950s is the colonoscope. One researcher working...

Patient recruitment: The balancing act

Well conducted patient and public engagement can have a positive impact on recruitment and retention. To really increase your chances of success you need to be engaging patients as early as possible in the...

Treading the path less travelled – A different approach to patient recruitment

In a previous issue, we spoke to Professor Miles Witham about his work to facilitate the participation of older people in clinical trials. Now we hear from Sarah Montague about a trial engaging homeless...

Entangled exploring the influences on brain development

Throughout history, much attention has been paid to the perceived differences between men’s and women’s brains – but are these differences real or imagined? One scientist overturning the myths of the ‘male’ and ‘female’ brain...

A golden era for blood cancer treatments

It’s an exciting time in blood cancer research. As we deepen our understanding of the biology of blood cancer, researchers are developing better treatments than ever before, and we’re even beginning to talk about...

The search for new antimicrobials

Few issues are more pressing than the global problem of antibiotic resistance, so we speak to Professor Mathew Upton, about his work searching for new antibiotics. “For so long now, antibiotics have been seen as...

New research predicts a positive future for biosimilars

The prospect of reducing treatment costs for payors supports a positive future for biosimilars Biosimilar approvals in the US market still significantly lag behind Europe despite an evolving regulatory landscape and three new...

Supercharged natural killer cells may hold promise for cancer

A type of ‘supercharged’ immune cell could be mass-produced to help fight cancer. The researchers behind the early-stage finding, from Imperial College London, say the development could mark the next generation of cutting-edge immunotherapy treatments,...

How chromosomes find a happy medium

By Sabrina Richards Staff writer at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Hutch scientists show how chromosomes communicate to balance crossovers during sex-cell formation Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have worked out the molecular underpinnings of...

Stanford shows that breast cancers punch tunnels into neighbouring tissue

Stanford researchers have found that malignant breast cancer cells can extend protrusions known as invadopodia to dig escape tunnels through surrounding tissue, revealing a possible new target for therapies. Cancers pose the greatest danger when...

Combatting antibiotic resistance

In the UK alone, the government estimates there are currently 5,000 deaths each year because antibiotics no longer work for some infections. Worldwide, drug-resistant infections are set to kill more people than cancer and...

Over three million surgical operations and cancer treatments a year in England may become...

New data published by Public Health England (PHE) show that antibiotic resistant bloodstream infections continue to rise in England, with an estimated 35% increase from 2013 to 2017 (from 12,250 in 2013 to...

90 years on, the time-bomb of antibiotic resistance

By Professor Colin Garner The events of 28 September 1928 could justifiably lay claim to being called the most significant breakthrough in medical history. With typical ingenuity and a quantity of genius, Sir Alexander Fleming discovered...

90 years since Sir Alexander Fleming’s penicillin discovery changed antibiotic treatment

“My name is Sarah Whitlow and my paternal grandfather was Sir Alexander Fleming, who discovered penicillin. I have worked as a practice nurse at the Swan Surgery in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, since 1990,...

Artificial Neural Networks working with Image Guided Therapies to improve heart disease treatment

By Rashed Karim Research Fellow at King’s College London School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences It’s exciting to envisage that future treatments for cardiovascular disease will be supported by intelligent systems and devices. At the...