Research

Cellular protein factories may contribute to ageing and related diseases

Research finds that the cellular assembly line that produces proteins can stall with age, triggering a snowball effect that increases the output of misfolded proteins. In humans, clumps of misfolded proteins contribute to age-linked Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Taylor...

Potential breakthrough in treatment of rare disease

Biotech company Actigen has initiated a clinical development programme for GNR-055, a potentially breakthrough treatment for the life-limiting, rare disease mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II) (also known as Hunter syndrome). Occurring in around 1 in 100,0000–170,000 births, MPS II presents...

Cancer cell ‘switch-off’ could aid deadly brain tumour treatment

Researchers believe they may have found a way to strengthen possible treatments for glioblastoma and reduce the speed at which the aggressive tumour progresses. Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumour in adults, and, as often resistant to treatment,...

Closing the Loop on personalised healthcare

Precision medicine using personalised treatments has entered mainstream healthcare. Closed Loop Medicine Ltd aims to level the playing field further with its drug and digital combination products. The Cambridge-based healthcare company is developing drug and digital therapeutic combination products centred...

Acesis breaks new ground with novel therapy solution to low testosterone

For the first time in over 70 years, a new testosterone replacement therapy has been unveiled. Dr Vassilios Papadopoulos and Dr Costas Karatzas, co-founders of Acesis BioMed, explain how their ‘first-in-class’ peptide therapeutics could transform men’s health across the...

Lab-grown ‘mini-stomachs’ could shed light on children’s COVID symptoms

A ‘lab-grown model’ of the human stomach, that can be used to study how infections affect the gastrointestinal system, has been developed for the first time. A UCL-led team of international scientists have built on recent advances to grow ‘mini-organs’...

Bacteria can develop strong immunity for protection against viruses

A new study hopes to exploit newly characterised defence systems in bacteria to compare changes to the human genome. University bioscientists have been working on the research to demonstrate the complex workings of bacterial innate immunity. Bacteria have evolved a multitude...

Light therapy helmet could help dementia patients

A new infrared light therapy has the potential to help people with dementia. A pilot study recently investigated how transcranial photobiomodulation therapy (PBM-T) –transferred through a specially adapted helmet -- could boost memory, motor function and processing skills in healthy...

Putting the diverse into neurodiversity

The global Institute Of Neurodiversity ION has launched its UK chapter. The Institute aims to give a global voice to all neurodiverse groups, and ensure neurodivergent individuals are understood, represented, and valued equally in society. Currently, 1 in 7 people in the UK...

Sizzling breakthrough for 3D meat

A 4oz steak has been ‘lab-grown’ using a digital design file. Israeli firm MeaTech 3D Ltd. cultivated the bio-printed steak using real fat and muscle cells. The cells were produced using an advanced process that starts by isolating ethically harvested...

‘Super jelly’ can survive being run over by a car

Researchers have developed a jelly-like material that can withstand the equivalent of an elephant standing on it, and completely recover to its original shape, even though it’s 80 per cent water. The soft-yet-strong material, developed by a team at the...

Shaping the science of oncology

Dr Fiona McLaughlin is the new Chief Scientific Officer of Avacta’s Therapeutics Division. She talks to Karen Southern about her mission to develop first and best-in-class cancer drugs. From the day that Dr McLaughlin – then a biochemistry student –...

Euro biotech: breaking down the barriers to a golden age

Converting cutting-edge research into viable products remains a challenge for the European biotech sector. Jonathan Hay of Delin Ventures investigates how ambition can translate to reality. Europe’s tech sector is going from strength to strength. The Covid-19 pandemic – and...

3D PRINTED LIVER AIDS LIFE SAVING SURGERY

Surgeons will perform liver resections with greater accuracy and deliver improved patient outcomes thanks to new research by Nottingham Trent University. Senior research fellow Richard Arm has developed a way to 3D-print scan data of cancer-hit patient organs so...

Genome sequencing reveals how salmonella carves out a niche in pork production

Variants of concern (VOCs) and variants of interest (VOIs) have become familiar terms due to the current pandemic, but variants of familiar pathogens such as salmonella also present a threat to human and animal health. To better understand the different...

New material to treat wounds can protect against resistant bacteria

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a new material that prevents infections in wounds – a specially designed hydrogel, that works against all types of bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant ones. The new material offers great hope for...

Blood oxygen levels could explain why memory loss is an early symptom of Alzheimer’s

The findings demonstrate how the brain’s memory centre operates at a ‘watershed’ making it especially vulnerable to damage Study suggests increasing blood flow in the hippocampus might be really effective at preventing damage and memory loss ...

What makes a spinout?

Universities carry out research into some of the most fundamental questions about life and the world around us, with researchers utilising specialist facilities and equipment to investigate and advance human knowledge.  This doesn’t happen overnight, and there is inherently a...

Covid-19 transmission chains in the UK traced through time and space with remarkable accuracy using genomic epidemiology

A team of scientists, led by researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh, has analysed the first wave of the Covid-19 outbreak in the UK and produced the most fine-scaled and comprehensive genomic analysis of transmission of any...

Pioneering technique paves way for fast and cheap fabrication of rapid medical diagnostic tools

Breakthrough promises to democratise microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technology, benefiting resource-poor countries and settings. New technology developed by the University of Bristol has the potential to accelerate uptake and development of on-chip diagnostic techniques in parts of the world where rapid...

UK Government invests £5m to develop ‘library’ of MRNA vaccines

CPI has received a £5 million investment to support the development of an mRNA ‘vaccine library’ as part of the Government’s vaccine support package announced in the Budget by the chancellor, Rishi Sunak. The vaccine library will form the basis...

Delivering real impact to the world of bioscience

Since it opened in 2019, the National Horizons Centre has quickly established itself as a vital linchpin helping drive forward the life sciences sector across the UK. Through research, partnerships and training , the National Horizons Centre, a £22.3 million...

CRYONISS EARNS COVETED MHRA QUALITY MARK

Experts in biological sample, and medicinal product, storage and logistics management, CRYONISS offers a comprehensive storage service from ambient down to vapour phase liquid nitrogen. The Cheshire-based team has a wealth of experience in supporting drug discovery projects, from early...

EXPANSION OF NETPARK OFFERS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES ROOM FOR GROWTH

The North-East Technology Park in County Durham – or NETPark as it is known – provides science, technology and engineering companies with the type of world-class laboratory, clean room and office space they require on the journey from start-up...

Automated drug discovery platform brings about paradigm change for research

Bringing a single new drug to market takes years of research and costs billions – with the COVID-19 pandemic highlighting even more how critical it is to accelerate this process. The high costs and failure rates in drug discovery...

WEAPONISING THE FIGHT AGAINST ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

Could faecal transplants be an effective weapon in the fight back against antibiotic resistance? A research team at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust intends to find out, once and for all. By HELEN COMPSON While faecal transplants have been...

HOPE ON THE HORIZON FOR ALZHEIMER’S TREATMENT

Dr Susan Kohlhaas Director of Research at Alzheimer’s Research UK People with dementia have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, according to the ONS, a quarter of people who have died from COVID-19 also had dementia. Changes to the...

Thriving commercial ecosystems will help universities to keep making an impact beyond Covid-19

Throughout 2020, the life sciences sector has been in the limelight. In the effort to overcome COVID-19, the sector has put into action an unprecedented global application of expertise. The deployment of great minds, public and private investment and...

TEAM TASKED WITH GIVING US FIVE EXTRA YEARS OF HEALTH AND HAPPINESS

The National Innovation Centre for Ageing is based in The Catalyst, the stunning new building with a glass façade rearing like a horse’s head out of the 24-acre, £350m science park that is the Newcastle Helix. The team within...

Opening new pathways for bioprocessing

A pivotal link between industry and academia, Teesside University’s £22m National Horizons Centre (NHC) opened last September with two very clear objectives. One is to drive research into bioprocessing, an often-overlooked subject through which life science discoveries are turned into...