Training and Education

A Cleanroom Garment’s journey towards sustainability

When one looks at the nature surrounding us, they can only be surprised by the smooth way it works – circularity and supplementary nature of processes ensures no resources are wasted. Human activity, on the other hand, is far from...

Vibrating glove helps stroke patients control spasms

After a stroke, survivors often experience uncontrollable spasms that can twist their arms and hands into perpetual fists. The only treatments are expensive, frequently painful injections of botulinum toxin or oral medications so strong they may put patients to...

Bacteria with the personal touch

The trillions of bacteria that call your body home — collectively known as the microbiome — appear to be unique to you like a fingerprint, writes Sarah C.P. Williams. That’s one conclusion of a detailed study of the gut, mouth,...

Collaboration, Clustering and Converting

Partnerships between small biotechs and Big Pharma could unlock faster drug development for rare diseases, says Dan Williams, PhD, CEO of SynaptixBio. In an increasingly interconnected and competitive world, collaboration has become an essential tool for organisations of all sizes....

Unlocking potential: The impact of CRISPR in organoid research

This exclusive article is by Dr. Ralph Vogelsang, Senior Director of Business Development & Licensing, ERS Genomics. Conventional drug discovery models, such as animal models or human cell lines, often fail due to their divergence from human biology. In fact,...

New antibiotic ‘evades bacterial resistance’

A promising new weapon has emerged in the fight against drug-resistant bacteria and resultant diseases, writes Rob Mitchum. The antibiotic cresomycin - described in Science - effectively suppresses pathogenic bacteria that have become resistant to many commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs. Developed...

Europe’s ‘disappearing’ generic medicines are a growing crisis

Europe’s critical medicine cabinets – in hospitals, pharmacies, and homes – are home to fewer generic medicines. These are the often-cheaper alternatives to brand name medicines, that make up 67%1 of all medicines. Research from Teva Pharmaceuticals shows that over the...

Tiny sea microbes could unlock new cures

Off the coast of Spain, studies of the marine microbiome are opening new doors for pharmacology, writes Claudia Alemañy Castilla. The island of Tabarca, near Alicante, is a tourist magnet. It’s also a working platform for the study of marine...

Sustainable Recirculating Fume Cupboards revolutionising Laboratory Practices

Laboratories play a crucial role in scientific research and innovation, yet they often consume significant amounts of energy and resources. One key contributor to this consumption is the ventilation system, particularly fume cupboards, which are essential for maintaining safe...

Contagious Maths hits the classroom

New resources developed at Cambridge are helping students learn how maths can help tackle infectious diseases. From measles and flu to SARS and COVID, mathematicians help us understand and predict the epidemics that can spread through our communities, and to...

New research into microplastics and nanoplastics urgently needed due to ‘significant’ health threat

A new metastudy published in Cambridge Prisms: Plastics by Cambridge University Press, has identified a body of evidence demonstrating the negative impact of microplastics and nanoplastics (MPs and NPs) on human health and identifying the limitations of current research. ‘Mitochondria...

Bacteria insights could boost rare cancer treatment

The microbiome can identify those who benefit from combination immunotherapy across multiple different cancers, including rare gynaecological cancers, biliary tract cancers and melanoma. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute in Australia and collaborators, have...

Limiting damage from an asthma attack could stop disease

Scientists at King’s College London have discovered a new cause for asthma that sparks hope for treatment that could prevent the life-threatening disease. Most current asthma treatments stem from the idea that it is an inflammatory disease. Yet, the life-threatening...

Can a selenium deficiency increase your risk of heart failure?

wedish scientists have found a substantially increased heart failure rate among people with low blood levels of the essential micronutrient selenium. Now, you have yet another reason to make sure to get plenty of selenium from your diet. Scientists from...

The cell that remembers allergies

Researchers have made a ground-breaking discovery: a new cell that remembers allergies. The discovery gives scientists and researchers a new target in treating allergies and could lead to new therapeutics, according to research published in Science Translational Medicine, which coins...

Calculating risk scores for Alzheimer’s

A new epigenetics collaboration has been announced between Sheffield Hallam University and PharmaKure, a clinical stage pharmaceutical company developing precision medicines for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. The partnership will focus on ‘gene-based environmental biomarkers’, known as epigenetic...

When do brains grow up?

Research shows mouse and primate brains mature at the same pace, writes Kristen Mally Dean. A study from Argonne National Laboratory reveals that short-lived mice and longer-living primates develop brain synapses on the exact same timeline, challenging assumptions about disease...

Promising first human trial for ‘wonder’ material

A revolutionary nanomaterial with potential to tackle multiple global challenges could be developed further without acute risk to human health, research suggests. Carefully controlled inhalation of a specific type of graphene – the world’s thinnest, super strong and super flexible...

Concussion: 7-year study funded by US Defense Department

University of Birmingham experts will lead a major research programme involving hundreds of people across the UK which aims to transform the way concussion is identified and managed. The seven-year contract by the U.S. Department of Defense has a potential...

‘Turbo-charged’ research into biodetection of airborne pathogens

The University of Hertfordshire has been awarded £13.5million – its biggest ever research grant – to expand and progress its sector-leading R&D of biodetection technologies against harmful, airborne pathogens like Covid. Herts was one of 18 research bids to successfully...

Butterfly DNA reveals little change after 250 million years in flight

The most extensive analysis of its kind reveals how butterfly and moth chromosomes have remained largely unchanged since their last common ancestor over 250 million years ago. This stability exists despite the incredible diversity seen today in wing patterns, sizes,...

Spin-out raises £8.5m to reveal the ‘unseen world of RNA’

Wobble Genomics – a University of Edinburgh spin-out whose novel approach to RNA sequencing could revolutionise many fields in biotechnology – has raised £8.5m to help commercialise its technology. Wobble, which is currently operating in stealth mode, has found a...

Affordable lab space faces ‘perfect storm’

An imbalance in lab space supply and demand is inhibiting growth in the UK’s Golden Triangle, says Mark Glatman, Chief Executive of Abstract Mid-Tech, and developer of South Cambridge Science Centre. Known as the ‘Golden Triangle’, Cambridge, Oxford and London...

University of Bath receives £25 million to train tomorrow’s research leaders

A new generation of scientists, mathematicians and engineers is to be trained at the University of Bath to solve some of the most important social, health and environmental challenges of our times, thanks to new funding of around £25...

Ukraine: science infrastructure severely damaged

A study released by UNESCO estimates the cost of restoring Ukraine’s public scientific infrastructure at more than $1.26 billion. It reveals that 1,443 buildings and laboratories, as well as 750 pieces of scientific equipment, have been damaged or destroyed since...

Technology unscrambles microbe chatter

Using a database of over 60,000 microorganisms curated by researchers from across the globe, a new search tool instantly matches microbes to the metabolites they produce. This is the claim of researchers from University of California San Diego, who collaborated...

Resilient UK biotech sector landed £1.8bn investment in 2023

The UK’s thriving life sciences and biotech sector showed resilience in 2023, securing £1.8 billion in equity investment despite a challenging global economic climate, according to the latest report by the UK BioIndustry Association (BIA). London-quoted biotechs also continue to...

Shocking stats reveal low awareness of AI laws in US and EU life sciences

Survey exposes knowledge gap surrounding AI legislation, with a fifth of respondents confirming regulations are blocking their research. ust nine per cent of life science professionals have a good awareness of the impact of emerging AI regulations for pharms R&D...

Combating falsified drugs – Ensuring patient safety throughout the global supply chain

Medicinal products are an appealing target for illicit trade, with an estimated annual cost of $200 billion and potentially millions of lives lost. The problem affects low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) disproportionately, and the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates...

Scientists develop new biocontainment method for industrial organisms

Researchers in the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (MIB) at The University of Manchester have developed a new biocontainment method for limiting the escape of genetically engineered organisms used in industrial processes. In a paper published in Nature Communications, Dr Stefan...